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Dobrynya Shiryaev
Dobrynya Shiryaev

Presidency Chart Apush Answers Benjamin Harrison: A Comprehensive Guide


Presidency Chart Apush Answers Benjamin Harrison




If you are taking AP US History (APUSH), you might be wondering how to study for the exam and remember all the important facts and details about the presidents of the United States. One useful tool that can help you with this task is a presidency chart, which is a summary of the main achievements, challenges, and controversies of each president's term. In this article, we will explain what a presidency chart is, how to create one, and how to use it for studying. We will also provide an example of a presidency chart for Benjamin Harrison, the 23rd president of the United States, who served from 1889 to 1893.




Presidency Chart Apush Answers Benjamin Harrison



Who was Benjamin Harrison?




Benjamin Harrison was born on August 20, 1833, in North Bend, Ohio. He was the grandson of William Henry Harrison, the ninth president of the United States, who died after only a month in office. Benjamin Harrison graduated from Miami University in Ohio in 1852 and became a lawyer in Indianapolis, Indiana. He married Caroline Scott in 1853 and they had two children. He served as a colonel in the Union Army during the Civil War and was wounded at the Battle of Resaca in 1864. After the war, he resumed his law practice and became involved in Republican politics. He was elected to the US Senate in 1880 and served until 1887.


Presidency (1889-1893)




In 1888, Harrison ran for president against the incumbent Democrat Grover Cleveland. Although Cleveland won the popular vote by a narrow margin, Harrison won the electoral vote by a wider margin, thanks to his support in the industrial states of the North and Midwest. Harrison's presidency was marked by several notable achievements and challenges, both at home and abroad.


On the domestic front, Harrison supported several bills that aimed to protect American industries, farmers, and workers. He signed the McKinley Tariff Act of 1890, which raised tariffs on imported goods to protect domestic producers. He also signed the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890, which outlawed monopolies and cartels that restrained trade and competition. He approved the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890, which increased the amount of silver that the government had to buy and coin, hoping to raise the prices of farm products and ease the debt burden of farmers. He also signed legislation that created six new states in the West: North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Washington, Idaho, and Wyoming.


However, Harrison also faced several challenges and controversies during his term. He had to deal with labor unrest and violence, such as the Homestead Strike of 1892 at Andrew Carnegie's steel plant in Pennsylvania, where workers clashed with strikebreakers and private guards. He also had to deal with racial tensions and violence in the South, where African Americans faced segregation, discrimination, and lynching. He tried to enforce civil rights laws and appoint black officials, but he faced opposition from white supremacists and Southern Democrats. He also had to deal with a severe economic depression that began in 1893, caused by overproduction, overspeculation, and falling prices.


Foreign policies and events




On the foreign front, Harrison pursued an active and expansionist policy that aimed to increase American influence and trade in the world. He negotiated several treaties and agreements with other countries, such as the Reciprocity Treaty of 1891 with Brazil, which lowered tariffs on certain products in exchange for preferential access to Brazilian markets. He also supported the annexation of Hawaii, which was a strategic and economic asset in the Pacific. He sent a naval force to Chile in 1891 to protect American interests during a civil war there. He also intervened in the Samoan Islands in 1889 to prevent Germany from taking over the islands. He also supported the Pan-American Conference of 1889, which was the first attempt to create a hemispheric organization of American states.


Post-presidency and death




In 1892, Harrison ran for re-election against Cleveland, but he lost both the popular and electoral vote. He returned to his law practice in Indianapolis and remarried in 1896 to Mary Dimmick, his late wife's niece. He also wrote several books and articles on history, law, and politics. He died of pneumonia on March 13, 1901, at the age of 67.


What is APUSH?




APUSH is an acronym for Advanced Placement US History, which is a college-level course and exam offered by the College Board. The course covers the history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the present, with an emphasis on analyzing historical evidence, interpreting primary and secondary sources, and developing historical arguments. The exam consists of multiple-choice questions, short-answer questions, a document-based question, and a long essay question.


The course and exam description




The College Board provides a detailed course and exam description for APUSH, which outlines the content, skills, and themes that students are expected to learn and demonstrate. The content is divided into nine historical periods, each with a set of key concepts and topics. The skills are divided into four categories: historical thinking skills, reasoning processes, disciplinary practices, and thematic learning objectives. The themes are seven overarching ideas that connect different aspects of American history, such as identity, politics and power, work and exchange, culture and society, migration and settlement, geography and environment, and America in the world.


The benefits and challenges of APUSH




Taking APUSH can have several benefits for students who are interested in history and want to challenge themselves academically. Some of these benefits are:


  • Learning about the diverse and complex history of the United States and its role in the world.



  • Developing critical thinking, reading, writing, and research skills that are essential for college success.



  • Earning college credit or placement if they score well on the exam.



  • Preparing for other AP courses and exams in related subjects, such as government, economics, psychology, or literature.



However, taking APUSH can also have some challenges that students should be aware of and prepared for. Some of these challenges are:


  • Coping with a large amount of content and information that needs to be memorized and understood.



  • Managing time and workload effectively to keep up with assignments, readings, and reviews.



  • Dealing with different perspectives and interpretations of historical events and issues.



  • Writing clear, coherent, and evidence-based essays that answer complex questions.



How to use presidency charts for APUSH




One of the tools that can help students study for APUSH is a presidency chart, which is a summary of the main achievements, challenges, and controversies of each president's term. Presidency charts can help students organize their notes, review key facts and details, compare and contrast different presidents and eras, and prepare for essay questions.


What are presidency charts?




A presidency chart is a table that contains information about a president's term in office. It usually has four columns: one for the president's name and years in office; one for domestic policies and events; one for foreign policies and events; and one for legacy and significance. Each column can have subheadings or bullet points that highlight the most important or relevant aspects of each category. For example:



PresidentDomestic Policies/EventsForeign Policies/EventsLegacy/Significance


-Transcontinental Railroad-13th Amendment-Assassination by John Wilkes Booth-Civil War-Emancipation Proclamation-Gettysburg Address-Second Inaugural Address-Trent Affair-Alabama Claims-Preserved the Union-Abolished slavery-Strengthened the federal government-Inspired generations of Americans


A presidency chart can be created for any president, using different sources of information, such as textbooks, websites, biographies, or primary documents. The information can be organized in different ways, depending on the purpose and preference of the student. For example, some students might prefer to use chronological order, while others might prefer to use thematic order. Some students might include more details and examples, while others might focus on the main points and keywords.


How to study with presidency charts




Presidency charts can be used for studying in various ways, depending on the goals and needs of the student. Some of the ways that presidency charts can be used are:


  • Reviewing and memorizing the facts and details about each president's term.



  • Comparing and contrasting different presidents and eras, looking for similarities and differences.



  • Analyzing and evaluating the causes and effects of each president's policies and actions.



  • Forming and supporting opinions and arguments about each president's achievements and failures.



  • Preparing for essay questions that ask about specific presidents or periods of American history.



An example of a presidency chart for Benjamin Harrison




To illustrate how a presidency chart can be created and used, here is an example of a presidency chart for Benjamin Harrison, the 23rd president of the United States, who served from 1889 to 1893.



PresidentDomestic Policies/EventsForeign Policies/EventsLegacy/Significance


Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893)-McKinley Tariff Act-Sherman Antitrust Act-Sherman Silver Purchase Act-Six new states admitted-Homestead Strike-Depression of 1893-Reciprocity Treaty with Brazil-Annexation of Hawaii-Naval intervention in Chile-Samoa Crisis-Pan-American Conference-Protected American industries and workers-Regulated monopolies and trade-Expanded American territory and influence-Faced economic and social challenges


A student can use this presidency chart to review the main facts and details about Harrison's term, such as the names of the acts he signed, the states he admitted, or the countries he dealt with. A student can also use this presidency chart to compare and contrast Harrison with other presidents, such as his predecessor Grover Cleveland or his successor William McKinley. A student can also use this presidency chart to analyze and evaluate the impact and consequences of Harrison's policies and actions, such as how they affected the economy, society, or foreign relations. A student can also use this presidency chart to form and support opinions and arguments about Harrison's achievements and failures, such as whether he was a successful or unsuccessful president, or whether he deserves more or less recognition in history.


Conclusion




In conclusion, a presidency chart is a useful tool that can help students study for APUSH by summarizing the main achievements, challenges, and controversies of each president's term. A presidency chart can help students organize their notes, review key facts and details, compare and contrast different presidents and eras, and prepare for essay questions. A presidency chart can be created for any president, using different sources of information and different ways of organizing it. A presidency chart can be used for studying in various ways, depending on the goals and needs of the student.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about presidency charts:


  • Q: How many presidents are there in APUSH?A: There are 45 presidents in APUSH, from George Washington to Joe Biden. However, not all of them are equally important or relevant for the course and exam. Some presidents have more influence and impact on American history than others, and some periods of American history are more emphasized and tested than others.



  • Q: How long should a presidency chart be?A: There is no fixed or ideal length for a presidency chart. It depends on how much information the student wants to include and how much space the student has. A presidency chart can be as short as one page or as long as several pages. The main goal is to make it clear, concise, and comprehensive.



  • Q: How can I make a presidency chart more interesting and engaging?A: There are several ways to make a presidency chart more interesting and engaging, such as using colors, images, symbols, or graphs to illustrate the information. A student can also use quotes, anecdotes, or trivia to add some personality and humor to the presidency chart. A student can also make connections and comparisons between different presidents and eras, or relate them to current events and issues.



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